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Flamingo

Flamingo

Phoenicopterus

Animalia

HABITAT

Large lakes and plant less lagoons

They are found in very salty or alkaline lakes. This is due to the presence of a large population of crustaceans (such as brine shrimp ) in highly saline reservoirs, where fish do not live due to high salinity.

PREY/DIET

Algae, Fish, Insects

Their pink color comes from small red crustaceans that contain a carotenoid. They specialize in only a few types of prey, and this is reflected in the form of their beak, which helps them in this.

DISTINCTIVE FEATURES

Long, curved beak and sleep standing on one leg

Standing on one leg flamingos, storks and other long-legged birds are used to minimize heat loss in the wind. This loss through legs uncovered with feathers due to their unfavorable ratio of volume to the surface is quite large, so the birds try to keep their legs alternately in the heat of a well-insulated plumage.

BIRD

ORDER

Phoenicopteriformes

FAMILY

Phoenicopteridae

GENUS

Phoenicopterus

BEHAVIOUR(Approx)

SIZE: 100cm - 150cm
WEIGHT: 2kg - 4kg
SPEED: 72kph
LIFE SPAN: 15 - 30 years
POPULATION: 1.5 - 2.5 million

CONSERVATION STATUS

  • LEAST CONCERN

One to three (usually one) large white eggs are incubated in the silt seal. Flamingos arrange high (up to 60 cm) cone-shaped nests of silt, mud and shell in shallow water. The chicks are born well developed, active and after a few days leave the nest. Parents feed young flamingos with bird’s milk, which is painted pink, as 23% consists of the blood of the parent. This food is secreted by special glands in the esophagus of adult birds and is nutritionally comparable to the milk of mammals. The chicks eat it for two months, until the beak of the chicks grows so much that they become able to filter food out of the water on their own. At the age of two and a half months young flamingos reach the size of adult birds and become on the wing.

The flamingos have thin long legs, flexible neck, and plumage, the color of which varies from white to red. Unlike most other birds, the movable part of the beak in flamingos is not the bottom, but the upper part. The front toes are connected by a swimming side. The pink or red color of flamingo plumage is given by dyeing substances of lipochromes, which birds receive together with food. When they are in danger, it is difficult for the predator to choose a certain prey from them, especially since the feathers on the wings are always black, and when flying they prevent to focus on the victim. In zoos, flamingos do not lose their unique coloration of plumage, as they add various carotene-containing products: grated carrots, sweet peppers and, most importantly, small crustaceans.

Flamingos are common in Africa, the Caucasus (Azerbaijan), Southeast and Central Asia, as well as in South and Central America.

Flamingos live in large colonies along the shores of shallow reservoirs or lagoons. Colonies of flamingos often number hundreds of thousands of individuals. However, poaching and the devastation of flamingo nests have led to a worldwide decline in their population. Flamingos are mostly sedentary, only the northern populations of pink flamingos are migratory.

Flamingos can cope even with extreme natural conditions in which only a few other species of animals survive. For example, they occur in very salty or alkaline lakes. This is due to the presence of a large population of rachkov (such as artemia) in highly salty reservoirs, where fish do not live because of high saltiness. Racki is the main food of flamingos. Flamingos can also be met on high-altitude lakes. In addition, they are able to tolerate very large temperature changes.

One to three (usually one) large white eggs is incubated in the silt seal. Flamingos arrange high (up to 60 cm) cone-shaped nests of silt, mud, and shell in shallow water. The chicks are born well developed, active and after a few days leave the nest. Parents feed young flamingos with bird’s milk, which is painted pink, as 23% consists of the blood of the parent. This food is secreted by special glands in the esophagus of adult birds and is nutritionally comparable to the milk of mammals. The chicks eat it for two months until the beak of the chicks grows so much that they become able to filter food out of the water on their own. At the age of two and a half months, young flamingos reach the size of adult birds and become on the wing.