Agrimony

Although egymoin was already used in prehistoric times, its healing properties were only discovered in antiquity. It was then used to treat liver disorders or soothe snake bites. It is anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic and can treat angina, sores or varicose ulcers.

Scientific name: Agrimonia eupatoria
Common names: sour, eupatory, eupatory eupatory of the ancients, eupatory of the Greeks, herb of St. William, herb of St. Magdalene, tea of the North, tea of the woods, soubeirette, Francormier, all-good
English names: common agrimony, church steeples, sticklewort
Botanical classification: rosacea family (Rosaceae)
Forms and preparations: infusions, powders, dried extracts, capsules, mother dye

Medicinal properties of Agrimony

INTERNAL UTILISATION
Astringent, diuretic, decongestant, antidiarrheal properties, increased gastric juice secretion, digestive system regulator, diabetes control.

EXTERNAL USE
Hemostatic (healing), anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antibacterial, antiviral.

USUAL THERAPEUTIC INDICATIONS
Treats pathological discharges (allergic rhinitis, leucorrhea, congested bronchi and diarrhea). Soothes some inflammations: gastrites; angina, laryngitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, hoarseness, tracheitis, liver disorders, aphites, gingivitis. Reduces bleeding. Helps fight kidney lithiasis, sores and varicose ulcers.

OTHER PROVEN THERAPEUTIC INDICATIONS
Acts on diabetes, diarrhea, intestinal infections; against the viruses responsible for influenza and hepatitis B.

Botanical description of Agrimony
Agrimony is a perennial plant with a hairy stem that can grow to 40 to 50 cm in height. The leaves are alternated and cut. They are toothed and hairy on both sides. The flowers are yellow, small, grouped in terminal ear. Fruits are akenes covered with hair and locked in a chalice.

Composition of Agrimony

USED PARTS
In herbal medicine, flowering luminaries are used.

ACTIVE PRINCIPLES
Condensed tannins; terpenes; flavonoids (including luteoline, apigenin, kaempferil, coumarin); plant phytosterol; eupatorin; vitamins K and P; Silica.

Use and dosage of the plant

Determination
It is considered that egret can be taken at a dose of 900 mg per day, to enhance digestive comfort. As an infusion (at 3% dried flower tops), drink 3 to 5 cups a day.

In external use, in the treatment of angina and pharyngites, egret can be used in gargles (10% decoction).

In lotion and compresses, for the improvement of wounds and varicose ulcers: 200 g of dried flowers will be mixed with 1 l of wine. Boil for five minutes, then leave to infuse for an hour.

Precautions for the use of Agrimony

The use of egret is safe, but is still not recommended for some people. It is therefore advisable to consult your doctor or pharmacist before using.

Contraindications
Agrimony is not recommended for people undergoing treatment for high blood pressure or low blood pressure.

ADVERSE EFFECTS
At commonly used doses, Agrimony has no known side effects. It can, however, lead to photodermatosis.

INTERACTIONS WITH MEDICINAL PLANTS OR SUPPLEMENTS
No known interaction.

INTERACTIONS WITH DRUGS
Agrimony should not be taken at the same time as diuretic antihypertensive drugs and is not recommended with anti-vitamin K.